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ARGENTINA, CHILI, AND BRAZIL

THE three best nations of South America are Argentina, Chili and Brazil. They have very fair governments and each year witnesses an improvement. The government of Brazil does not yet rank with those of Argentina and Chili.

Nothing has had a greater influence in freeing and developing these nations than the commercial genius of England. Contact with the English mind always lifts up and improves every section of the world which receives it.

The Englishman has intermarried with the residents of these countries and it is his money and influence that has made them as great as they are. And this great amount of foreign money forces respect for the ideas and desires of the Englishman, the greatest commercial force the world has ever known.

England has not a political protectorate over any of these countries, hers is a commercial and financial one. But had Brazil been for thirty years one of England's colonies, it would be one of the greatest countries on earth. The mind of man cannot grasp its natural resources and riches, nor what it would be today had it been part of the British Empire for thirty years. Brazil has done very well, but England understands how to develop and govern colonies as no other nation does. The wonders produced in Australia would never have been produced by any nation other than England.

English money is already found in all parts of Latin America and would be to the same extent as in Argentina, Chili and Brazil, if good governments existed and the Englishman felt that it was as safe a field.

Take therefore, the talent from him and give it unto him which hath ten talents.
For unto every one that hath shall be given, and he shall have abundance: but from him that hath not shall be taken away even that which he hath.
MATTHEW XXV. 28, 29.

In every civilized land freedom is only grated to the inhabitants of the country so long as they do not abuse it, and if they do abuse it, the offenders have their freedom taken from them. Laws of property are respected and the offender against the laws of life is restrained. Were this not so, chaos would reign and there would in time be no nation. It is understood that harmony is the foundation stone of order and civilization.

That which would not be allowed in Berlin, London or New York --- that which is a crime against the laws there --- is a crime in Central America or South Africa. If nations disturb the peace, it is worse than if individuals do so. An individual may break the laws of good government, but he can be restrained and the nation's progress is not stopped, but if a nation remains turbulent, its progress is not only rewarded, but it goes backward instead of forward.

Progress is the law of the infinite. Talents must be used, must be put out at interest, or the right to them is forfeited.

The first consideration is the welfare of their nation, for the sake of the people who inhabit it and for those who might settle there if good government existed.

This does not mean that a strong nation actuated by greed or land hunger shall by force seize a weaker nation, any more than a strong man should steal from a weaker one, but it does mean that any strong nations have the right to establish and preserve peace in the world. There is a wide gulf between "grab" and the higher aim of uplifting man.

Again all the world would have been the gainer had Brazil and Argentina agreed on a joint protectorate over Uruguay and Paraguay or had made a division of the territory comprised in those two countries, after the awful wars forced on them by the fiend Lopez in the '60's, which lasted until 1870.

Their histories from then on would have been much more peaceful than they have been; their debts could have been paid, as greater prosperity would have meant larger incomes.

Argentina during the last thirty years has had its local troubles, but it has worked out a high standing for itself as a nation, and is now, no doubt, on a strong basis. This would have carried Uruguay and Paraguay along in the march of progress and would have been of incalculable gain to South America.

I quote here the interesting statement of the Hon. Y. Takekoshi, member of the Japanese House of Representatives. If you substitute for the words "barbarous people," "incompetent people," you have the exact stand that I take in this chapter. Mr. Takekoshi says:

It is the universal rule that civilized nations have the right and are bound to lead barbarous peoples to civilization and enlightenment. Europeans are able to step into any uncivilized region of the earth by virtue of their training and call such barbarians "the white man's burden."

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